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M200 Specifications

Dimensions
13.6" x 14" x 16.9"
released date
May

23

2013
the m200 weighs 28.7 pounds

28.7

has wifi
Upc n
769173  997011
build volume
7.9" x 7.9" x 7.1"

Editorial Review

In the 3D printing-verse, “plug-and-play” doesn’t really mean what it does for other technologies. With hours worth of setup and exacting calibration processes for even the most “straightforward” pre-assembled machines, the expression “plug-and-print” has come to signify more nebulous standards on the order of getting from unboxing to printing in less than a week, without having to order and implement any number of optional-but-essential modifications and upgrades. Optimizing a printer to perform specialized tasks and/or work well with alternative materials can easily veer away from even that looser standard to something more akin to earning an advanced technical degree and completing an intensive internship program.

It’s no small feat, then, that the Zortrax M200, spawn of a successful Polish Kickstarter project, earns accolades like “best plug-and-play on the market” and “truly easy setup.” Outstanding build quality, ease of use, precision, and reliability help raise the M200’s perception of value, in spite of its being a bit more expensive than similar competitors. But the M200’s ability to be up and running precision prints in less time than it takes to list the number of steps involved in setting up rivals like homegrown wunderkind the Lulzbot Taz 5 wins over users who’re put off by complicated setup. Beyond that, the choice of manual or automated precision calibration minimizes the potential for aggravation for fumbling newbies and talented tinkerers alike.

Once it gets rolling, the M200 rocks out ABS, HIPS, and ULTRAT builds like nobody’s business, ranking highly for stability, and consistency. Although its build volume is smaller than others in its class, and its partially enclosed build area can take a while to heat up, users rate its capability with smaller, more complex objects well above that of comparable machines. As much as the M200 has going for it, though, Zortrax isn’t quite ready for a touchdown dance yet.

The ability to produce high-quality ABS objects only goes so far when it depends entirely on the use of proprietary systems and expensive filaments. On top of that, the M200 isn’t winning any contests in the connectivity department. Reportedly surly customer service and nonexistent technical support aren’t doing the M200 any favors, either. But if Zortrax could improve the openness and adaptability of its systems, and maybe take a page out of Wanhao’s book on standing behind its products, the biggest name in plug-and-print convenience could be Polish.

Zortrax M200 | Reviewed by Botdb | Rating: 5

M200 Reviews From Around The Web


Inclination

One issue . . . burn marks on the parts of the print. It only happens on really small areas that have a chance to lift up in between layers.

Tom's Guide
reddit.com
Inclination

Like all complex machines... it has it's quirks. But the overall build quality and attention to detail is excellent.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

The software lacks some functionality, but must admit that the slicing algorithm is pretty good.

Tom's Guide
3dhubs.com
Inclination

The software is easy to use for prints - I can pause the job and change filament colors if needed, even shows me the cost to make the model and the time to make it.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

The menu system is easy to navigate and the whole machine only has one knob to operate all functions on the menu system.

Tom's Guide
reddit.com
Inclination

Assembly, operation and implementation are user-friendly and an appealing solution for all types of users.

Tom's Guide
all3dp.com
Inclination

It continues to live up to its well deserved reputation as an easy to use, reliable machine with great quality results.

Tom's Guide
3dhubs.com