imageone of two
imagetwo of two

Cue Specifications

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small bottom hand
9.5"
8"
released date
September

19

2017
the cue weighs 2 pounds

2

phone controllable
has bluetooth
Upc n
857793  005671

Editorial Review

The Wonder Workshop Cue may get its name because it looks like a stack of cue balls, ready to go flying off on a four-dimensional billiard table. Or maybe it's short for "cute," because the Cue has an engaging set of illuminated facial expressions and a sassy attitude to go with them. Cue is so cute it ought to be spirited away to a Studio Ghibli movie, but his selling points don't stop with adorability. He has four different faces (which Wonder Workshop likes to call avatars), all of which look like superheroes when you choose them from his smartphone app but which end up looking like giant eyes when they're in place. (Its basic face is glowing LEDs arranged into humanoid features.)

Cue has an accelerometer and a gyroscope, so it knows its bodily orientation and can do something about it. Two of its cue ball wheels are motorized, so it can take off like an 8-ball out of heck when you give it a command. It can tilt and turn its head under your control, but it can also be used to send text messages. It'll even react to your texts, so maybe that funny head tilt is just its way of asking what "OMG!" means. From the viewpoint of parents (and perhaps even their kids), its most exciting feature is that it can be programmed, in more than one way, so it's basically a starter kit in bot coding -- and coding in general. Kids can drag and drop rudimentary sequential commands using a simple programming language called Block, but more ambitious users can program this brainy bot in Javascript, using a text editor built in to the app.

Cue is a follow-up to Wonder Workshop's Dash and Dot, which look a lot like him (with Dot just a single cue ball) but are geared more for younger children while Cue is being marketed at texting-happy tweens. If these bots are too cute (or provoke too much adolescent squealing) for your taste but you still want your kids to learn programming, look at the Arcbotics Sparki, the Makeblock Ultimate 2.0 or the EZ-Robot Roli Rover.

Wonder Workshop Cue | Reviewed by Botdb | Rating: 5

Cue Reviews From Around The Web


Inclination

Bought this for my niece's birthday. She wasn't the only one who loves it so now I'm planning to buy a couple more... I like the fact that it's very educational!

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

We have had our Cue Robot for about a month and been having a great time with it! It has features that have been fun for our 9 and 11 year old, as well as the adults!

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

This toy is definitely worth the money. Since Cue CleverBot's programming capabilities are advanced, it will not get old quickly.

Tom's Guide
tomsguide.com
Inclination

Lets code-curious kids actively engage with the robot...via a text-based chat function that includes a vocabulary of more than 170,000 words.

Tom's Guide
engadget.com
Inclination

Kids can use a simple block program or JavaScript text mode to take the reins in a freestyle coding environment, playing with all kinds of cool features.

Tom's Guide
engadget.com
Inclination

It can communicate in a variety of ways. You can send text message commands to it from your smartphone, via Bluetooth connectivity.

Tom's Guide
venturebeat.com
Inclination

Designed to engage users emotionally through intelligence, humor, and deep content...Has proximity sensors, encoders, a gyro sensor, accelerometer, and microphones.

Tom's Guide
venturebeat.com
Inclination

It allows users to talk to Cue and ask it questions about how to use it rather than reading an instruction manual, and there are also funny responses built in.

Tom's Guide
geekdad.com
Inclination

Will sing songs, use its front sensor to fist-bump you, and teach you how to use the app...The Code portion of the app will walk you through various coding challenges.

Tom's Guide
geekdad.com