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Mini Specifications

Dimensions
1.7" x 1.7" x 1.7"
released date
September

29

2017
the mini weighs 0.1 pounds

0.1

phone controllable
battery life

45

minutes
has bluetooth
has usb
Upc n
817961  020523

Editorial Review

The Sphero Mini lives up to its name. It's the size and shape of a billiard ball and a pool hustler could probably make a fortune slipping it onto a felt table and controlling it by -- get this -- just tilting his head. For a device that could pass as a ping pong ball, the Mini is one of the most versatile bots in the automaton marketplace, and judging from their ads, Sphero isn't just marketing this for kids. It's aimed at everyone from 8-year-olds to high-school students and beyond. Talk about fun for the whole family.

The Mini can be controlled in a remarkable number of ways. Not only does it react to head tilts but to facial expressions (aimed, presumably, at its smartphone app). Give it a goofy grin and see what it decides to do. There are joystick-like controls on the app, but simply moving your smart device around will cause it to change direction as it scoots across a table top or a hardwood floor. Thrust your phone at it and see how it reacts. The Mini is a toy that you can race around tracks and experiment with endlessly. When you get tired of making googly eyes at it or contorting your iPhone, you can use the Sphero Edu app to program it with a drag-and-drop programming language or full-blown Javascript. If the Mini had been around in the 1970s, Steve Wozniak would probably have started his career like this. (Honestly, there are probably thousands of times more circuits in the Mini than in the original Apple ][.)

The Mini is also colorful. It comes with a set of interchangeable plastic shells to vary up the look and it flashes its LED lights in what Sphero claims are millions of colors, so you could also use it as a Christmas tree ornament. (Just don't make faces at the app while it's hanging from a branch.) Sphero is also the maker of the similar 2.0 and the Star Wars BB-8 Droid, but the Mini is a generation beyond those. For comparable if less capable devices, look at the Ozobot Bit and the Dfrobot Vortex.

Sphero Mini | Reviewed by Botdb | Rating: 4.5

Mini Reviews From Around The Web


Inclination

Users can drive it around, program it, and play games with it through its companion iOS / Android app. There are four options for driving the Mini.

Tom's Guide
theverge.com
Inclination

About the same size as a golf ball and comes with a removable shell...isn't waterproof and connection range is limited to 10 meters.

Tom's Guide
engadget.com
Inclination

You can control the toy with facial expressions, use it as a controller for various included mini-games, or drive it around manually.

Tom's Guide
androidpolice.com
Inclination

Compatible with the Sphero EDU app that lets kids experiment with coding...comes with a swappable outer shell and lights up. It feels more kid-oriented overall.

Tom's Guide
theverge.com
Inclination

There's no on/off button inside so you need to charge it every time you use it...the plastic cover is too slippery for hard floors.

Tom's Guide
amazon.co.uk
Inclination

Not a good direction follower...calibration does not last long. If you try to re-calibrate later, it is obvious that the LED is pointing in the wrong direction.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

It’s easy to control, moves at a satisfying speed. The plethora of driving modes, games and educational elements makes this hands down one of Sphero's best products.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

Really fantastic. A good price for a very well rounded piece of equipment and the apps, especially the EDU app are impressive.

Tom's Guide
amazon.co.uk
Inclination

One hour of charge gets you about 45 minutes of play time. The LED light can be set to shine in millions of colors.

Tom's Guide
newatlas.com
Inclination

Includes a new feature called Face Drive, where the toy is scanning your face and its motions are guided by your expressions...it was both fun and unnerving.

Tom's Guide
techcrunch.com