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Solar Pool Technologies Solar Breeze

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Solar Breeze Specifications

Dimensions
26" x 22" x 9"
released date
February

14

2014
the solar breeze weighs 13.4 pounds

13.4

Editorial Review

The Solar Pool Technologies Solar Breeze adds a couple of nice touches to the automated pool cleaner game. The first is right in the name: It's solar-powered. It will suck up rays from the sun as it floats on top of the pool, storing up enough that it can keep working for a couple of hours after the sun sets. The second is that it can chlorinate your pool as it goes, using chlorine pellets stored in a removable panel inside the unit. Granted, pool cleaners that run off house electric only use up about 25 watts, for a cost of around 15 cents per cleaning on your electric bill, but if you're eco-conscious, the Solar Breeze will take your pool cleaner completely off the grid, which will doubtlessly be a major selling point for some pool owners.

The downside is that it works entirely on the surface of your pool, skimming up leaves and other debris and storing them in a removable filter on the top, but it won't get down and dirty with the algae clinging to your pool wall and on the bottom, the way that cleaners like the Maytronics Dolphin Supreme M3 and the Aquabot Elite will, so factor that into your buying decision. The Solar Breeze moves slowly across the surface of the water, like a sled on very sticky ice, and can turn itself automatically when it reaches the pool's edge or finds itself in a corner. Watching it is almost hypnotic, as you wonder what's going on in that tiny robotic brain when it discovers that it's run out of pool surface to clean, then figures out which way to go to find more.

The Solar Breeze, for all its environmentally friendly features and ability to chlorinate the water, isn't really an industrial strength pool robot. If a surface skimmer is all you need, it will do the job and won't suck up your electrical power to do it. But you should look at some of the other cleaners on the market, like the above-mentioned Maytronics and Aquabot models as well as the Pentair Kreepy Krauly Prowler 820 and the Hayward SharkVac.

Solar Pool Technologies Solar Breeze | Reviewed by Botdb | Rating: 5

Solar Breeze Reviews From Around The Web


Inclination

Leaves the surface spotless and crystal clear...has a dual speed pump...did an amazing job. I also put it through a debris test which it passed.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

My pool has never looked better, my electric bill is down about 40 percent...What I am most amazed at is the battery life. It seems that it is always running.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

Solar-Breeze is worth every last cent. It expertly cleans the surface of our pool each and every day.

Tom's Guide
solar-breeze.com
Inclination

It runs throughout the night and never stops unless I switch it off. I never see leaves and debris on the bottom of the pool any more.

Tom's Guide
solar-breeze.com
Inclination

It worked well for about 15 months and then it would not move around the pool. Also the exterior casing became badly sun damaged and is cracked.

Tom's Guide
productreview.com.au
Inclination

If it works well, it could replace the built in pump and skimmer of the pool in most cases, saving a considerable amount of energy.

Tom's Guide
robotbg.com
Inclination

If you get less than about 4 hours of sunlight, the Solar Breeze is, likely, not for you...occasionally gets stuck in a corner, but it backs up on its own.

Tom's Guide
troublefreepool.com
Inclination

No other products of similar capability. It has surpassed itself by incorporating new programming routines for better navigation and incorporating an erosion feeder.

Tom's Guide
poolservicema.com
Inclination

It’s a bit pricey, but if we can cut back on our pool pump usage and lower the energy bill, it will pay for itself in less than a year.

Tom's Guide
poolzoom.com
Inclination

Thankfully, there are robots like the Solar-Breeze which will remove surface debris and reduce pump usage costs without needing much more than sunlight.

Tom's Guide
gizmodo.com.au