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Vive Specifications

released date
April

30

2016
the vive weighs 1.2 pounds

1.2

video camera included
remote control included
has bluetooth
has usb
Upc n
821793  048235
a video

Editorial Review

The HTC Vive made its first appearance in 2015, and is a joint venture by HTC and Valve. This is room-scale, full-immersion VR where the user is at the center of the excitement. It features 32 headset sensors for 360-degree tracking. 2160x1200 combined resolution plus a 90-hertz refresh rate make for terrific graphics and smooth action. Vive has a front-facing camera, a 110-degree field of view, and 2 handheld wireless controllers, each with 24 sensors for more accurate motion sensing. There is a multi-function track pad for HD haptic feedback, and the Chaperone guidance system alerts the player when he or she gets near the boundaries of the play space. The headset's strap is adjustable, and it comes with interchangeable foam inserts and nosepads so that it fits over most eyeglasses.

The Vive's two base stations give 360-degree tracking and are synced wirelessly, requiring only a power cable. If ordered directly from Vive, the player also gets the Tilt Brush, Fantastic Contraption, and Job Simulator games. Professional in-home installation of Vive is available in certain cities, which sounds like a good idea as some users say that the system is difficult to set up. There may also be issues of power cord entanglement, but overall, the consensus appears quite favorable.

Virtual reality --VR – is directly advancing technology as it expands the parameters of its own uses. It has applications in gaming, 3D simulations, and medicine, and VR headsets are a method by which such fully immersive experiences can be appreciated. The Forte VFX1 was one of the first commercial headsets, debuting at the 1994 CES, possessing stereoscopic displays, stereo headphones, and 3-axis tracking. In 1997, the Glasstron had deeper immersion with its optional sensor that allowed the perspective to move as the head moved. These early versions have lain the groundwork for the upcoming batch of VR headsets, a few of which include the Google Cardboard, the LG 360 VR, and the Samsung Gear VR, which work with mobile phones.

HTC Vive | Reviewed by Botdb | Rating: 4.5

Vive Reviews From Around The Web


Inclination

The controls are intuitive for all the games I've tried...The headphones are a pain to put in, but work very well. Easily fixed if you have your own headset for gaming.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

This headset is pure awesomeness...truly gives you beyond a solid experience, especially with its room-scale VR...This thing is a pain to set up.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

Positioning the lighthouse sensors that detect your position in the room can be a pain...There’s just a few buttons to press, and connectivity issues were rare.

Tom's Guide
digitaltrends.com
Inclination

I don't want to sit in a chair in VR, I want to be inside VR and that's what Vive lets me do...The games and experiences also need more polishing.

Tom's Guide
wareable.com
Inclination

Offers a flat-out amazing virtual reality experience with sharp visuals, great motion controls and full-room sensing to walk around in virtual space.

Tom's Guide
cnet.com
Inclination

Long wires and lots of equipment take time and space to set up. Steam VR offers a lot of software but it isn't always beginner-friendly.

Tom's Guide
cnet.com
Inclination

It's more immersive than the competition thanks to the ability to walk around in the space...Pure and simple, the HTC Vive is awesome.

Tom's Guide
techradar.com
Inclination

The motion controllers look large, but they're relatively light and fit into your hands well. They sport touchpads on top, along with menu and system buttons.

Tom's Guide
engadget.com