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Future Motion Onewheel

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imagetwo of five

Onewheel Specifications

Dimensions
9" x 11.5" x 30"
the onewheel weighs 25 pounds

25

maximum speed

15

phone controllable

Editorial Review

Bearing a significantly different design approach than the "hoverboards" of somewhat dubious distinction, the Future Motion Onewheel is a truly unique product, one more than worthy of the widespread acclaim it's already received. After a 2014 Kickstarter campaign raised over 630% of the team's $100,000 goal, and a successful showing at the 2014 CES, Onewheels were practically flying off the metaphorical shelves (real shelves are so 20th century); according to the founders, this seemingly meteoric rise was actually the product of five years of hard work.

What sold the Onewheel in the hearts and minds of its riders is clear once you see it, from the sturdy minimalist construction to the natural and easy ride once you're on it. The thick, singular wheel is hardy enough, and the brushless hub motor powering it strong enough, to handle on and off road equally well. The fifteen miles per hour top speed and the six or seven miles of distance on a full charge suggest that the Onewheel might even be construed as a practical way to get around, say, a crowded city — particularly when considered the mere twenty minutes it takes to full charge. On all levels, the Onewheel makes sense. It's a well-designed and well-engineered product in an area rife with unoriginal copycats and (sometimes) dangerous knock-offs.

In fact, the team at Future Motion has already found themselves having to fight off the aforementioned competitive forces just a few short years into their entrance on the marketplace. Back in February of 2016, Future Motion attempted to quietly drop their lawsuit against competitor Changzhou — charging that their singular-wheeled electric vehicle violated an international patent filed by Future Wheel. The move wasn't without fallout, as Changzhou counter-filed for an imbursement of the attorney fees expended in defending themselves in the whole mess. The vignette serves as just another reminder of how twisted the pursuit of innovation can get in the presence of competitive interests. We can only hope that Future Motion, and companies like them who truly want to build us a better future, adhere to the stated reason for dropping the suit in the first place: stick to "innovating, instead of litigating."

Future Motion Onewheel | Reviewed by Botdb | Rating: 5

Onewheel Reviews From Around The Web


Inclination

It works better than I imagined, it would leave trails at camp. Perfect little vehicle to ride around.

Tom's Guide
onewheel.com
Inclination

The sensation of riding is pure pleasure. I'm amazed by the engineering and love the robust design.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

We love it but is not very practical, especially if you're on a budget.

Tom's Guide
outdoorgearlab.com
Inclination

Very versatile, and absolutely a blast to ride everywhere.

Tom's Guide
bestbuy.com
Inclination

Once you get the hang of it, you will wonder why nobody came up with a one wheeled design before.

Tom's Guide
chooseboards.com
Inclination

It's rated at 15mph, but people are regularly getting around 20mph. It's not just the speed, though. This goes everywhere -- sand, grass, bumpy sidewalks, single track.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

Even better than I thought. This is not simple at first, but I love it. Great for exercise.

Tom's Guide
bestbuy.com