Zxkq7u90yjbx8jjywjax

Epson Moverio BT-200

imageone of five
imagetwo of five

Moverio BT-200 Specifications

Dimensions
6.7" x 7.3" x 1.3"
released date
September

3

2014
the moverio bt-200 weighs 0.2 pounds

0.19

video camera included
battery life

6

hours
has wifi
has bluetooth
has usb
Upc n
010343  913905

Editorial Review

The Epson Moverio BT-200 and other smart glasses like it, including the legendary but now-elusive Google Glass, attempt to give the ordinary person a head-up-display, or HUD, like pilots use in a fighter jet. These augmented-reality glasses look out on the real world while projecting data on it. And they allow the wearer to take photos and video of everything they see.

Don't confuse this augmented reality with virtual reality. Virtual reality creates a fantasy world and puts you in it. Augmented reality takes the real world and puts fantasy in it. Or information. Or something that just wasn't there before.

Why would you want to wear glasses that do things like this? Aside from the possibility that you're a spy or a voyeur and have some special uses for that camera, you might just have a demand for constant information from the Internet and not feel like pulling your smartphone out of your pocket or glancing down at your smartwatch. Be warned, however, that there's a growing social stigma associated with smart glasses, especially in the Silicon Valley area, where Google Glass users got a reputation for seeming both antisocial and voyeuristic. Talk with a person wearing smart glasses and you know they aren't just looking at you: They may also be reading their email or taking photographs of you without your hair combed.

This may be why Epson is emphasizing industrial uses for the Moverio, distributing it to reviewers with apps that recognize appliances and display ways of repairing them. If that's what you need, this might work for you. If you're a runner or cyclist, on the other hand, and need head-up fitness info, like speed and heart rate, you might be better off looking at the Recon Jet.

Epson Moverio BT-200 | Reviewed by Botdb | Rating: 3

Moverio BT-200 Reviews From Around The Web


Inclination

Good video quality...Good battery life. Chargeable from any USB connection...Typing is a pain...Any app that rotates the screen when ran is a problem.

Tom's Guide
epson.com
Inclination

I was blown away...With the light tinted shade I am able to walk around my home, see what I am doing and still able to manipulate what I want to see on the screen.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

The glasses have a very hard time connecting to the store to buy apps, they do not stay connected to the phantom through wifi and I just do not feel safe using them at all.

Tom's Guide
amazon.com
Inclination

Runs Android 4.0. Relatively easy to wear and use. Comes with handy carrying case.

Tom's Guide
pcmag.com
Inclination

Currently no real consumer purpose unless you're a developer or a dedicated gadgeteer. Can feel uncomfortable when worn with glasses.

Tom's Guide
pcmag.com
Inclination

They're a little heavy, hard to control and have an aggravating tendency to give me headaches...I couldn't wear them on a daily basis without feeling sick.

Tom's Guide
engadget.com
Inclination

With a clunky design an interface in dire need of an update, it's best to avoid the Moverio BT-200 smart glasses and wait for what Epson cooks up next.

Tom's Guide
techradar.com
Inclination

Instead of small screen, you are completely immersed in a digital display...You can also stream videos from Netflix and other services right to your eyes.

Tom's Guide
mashable.com
Inclination

Familiar Android interface. Decent battery life...Clunky hardware needs a lot of polish. Low-end components.

Tom's Guide
digitaltrends.com