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3Doodler Pro

A Look At The Pro

released date
September

1

2016

Editorial Review

Ladies and gentlemen, let's have a great big hand (preferably the one you use to draw with) for the next generation of 3D printing pens. Unlike the dozens of 3D pens flooding the market that use standard ABS and PLA plastic filaments to create 3D sculptures, the 3Doodler Pro will also use wood, nylon, copper and bronze. Okay, the tip of the pen doesn't actually heat those last two substances to their melting temperatures, which would probably cause your living room to burst into flame, but it uses plastic filaments infused with them, giving your hand-drawn sculptures the sheen, feel and smell of the real materials. Now you might be able to create a model of the Eiffel Tower that actually bears a passing resemblance to the actual Eiffel Tower. Or the Statue of Liberty in the original bronze without its oxidized green patina. Maybe you can draw clothing. The finished result can be polished and sanded.

Be warned that this pen is still going to get very hot. It uses polycarbonate plastics, which have a melting point of 250 degrees, so the tip of the pen will be hot enough to pose a danger to nearby furniture, not to mention the humans occupying it. The tip is so hot that the unit includes a cooling fan. To emphasize that this is a serious artistic tool for adult artists rather than a birthday present for pre-teens, 3Doodler initially rolled out the Pro only through the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), New York's home of cutting-edge artistic confabulations before releasing it elsewhere. It also costs an order of magnitude more than most PLA/ABS-based pens, so it's not a stocking stuffer.

Like ordinary 3D pens, there are controls for extrusion speed, but a control for the fan as well. And, of course, there's an LCD screen for you to monitor the temperature and settings. If the first-of-its-kind 3Doodler Pro is more than you're bargaining for, you can check out the more than ample selection of alternatives, which would include the 3Doodler Create and the Scribbler V2.

3Doodler Pro | Reviewed by Botdb | Rating: 5

Pro Experiences From Around The Web


Inclination

It has a new, lightweight carbon fiber shell, an LCD display to give information on its condition, and dials to adjust extrusion speed and temperature.

Tom's Guide
theverge.com
Inclination

A freehand pen that can print with materials containing real wood, copper and bronze...gives you a lot more control over the printing than the previous, more basic models.

Tom's Guide
engadget.com
Inclination

Provides a neat aesthetic touch, where the results look and smell like the real thing. The copper and bronze can even shine after polishing.

Tom's Guide
all3dp.com
Inclination

Offers a range of alternative filaments that are going to have plenty of designers excited, with the ability now to use wood, copper, bronze, nylon, and polycarbonate.

Tom's Guide
3dprint.com
Inclination

The new materials offer a range of new finishing styles and advantageous properties, especially for professional users.

Tom's Guide
3ders.org
Inclination

You can select between 3 modes: Off, Low and High. Your choice will depend on the type of piece of art you’re creating.

Tom's Guide
3dprintingindustry.com